Years & Years - CANCELLED. REFUNDS AT POINT OF PURCHASE

Monqui Presents

Years & Years - CANCELLED. REFUNDS AT POINT OF PURCHASE

Cyn

Sun, October 28

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

Crystal Ballroom

Portland, OR

$26

Cancelled

This event is all ages

The Years & Years concert has been cancelled.
From the artist:

Due to unforeseen scheduling issues we regretfully need to cancel this date
Tickets can be refunded at point of purchase.
We hope to return again at another time.

Apologies for any inconvenience

Years & Years
Years & Years
The Years & Years concert has been cancelled.
From the artist:

Due to unforeseen scheduling issues we regretfully need to cancel this date
Tickets can be refunded at point of purchase.
We hope to return again at another time.

Apologies for any inconvenience

In the five years it took from conception to completion of the debut Years and Years album Communion, frontman Olly Alexander did a lot of growing up. Part of this was the simple, pleasing physical experience of seeing huge success at close range. ‘When the album started I was 23,’ Olly notes. He will be 28 this year. ‘I’ve discovered a lot about myself.’ With Communion, Years and Years made a palpable new tribal impact on pop. They mapped out something of the treasure trail of pop’s special inlet, locating a loyal band of brothers and sisters for whom Olly meant more than someone to look up to, glistening on stage. He felt like a friend.

‘I had three years of mind-fuck, crazy experiences travelling around the world,’ he continues. It all came as something of a shock to Olly. ‘I genuinely thought that those things would never happen or that people would respond to a gay pop star slut-dropping on stage.’ When he stepped aside from touring the record at the end of 2016, he began to think a little harder and deeper about his purpose. ‘It’s changed my beliefs in what I am capable of doing.’

When he began performing, Olly used to take the magical leap of faith all performers must de facto rely on, that they might have a place up there reserved for themselves. ‘I always used to go out on stage and be a bit scared,’ he says. It was all guesswork at that stage. ‘I was nervous, connected to my experiences growing up as a queer kid at school. I was always wary of enemies, of thinking people were going to tear me down or hurt me.’

He felt the fear and did it anyway. ‘Going out on stage is a bit like putting on this armour for me. Applaud me now. I can do this.’ By the close of the album campaign, he’d very nearly started to believe it. ‘It started to change when I’d see so many queer kids in the front row. They were just having the best times of their lives, making friends with each other. I had never experienced anything like that until I’d become the singer of Years and Years.’
Cyn
Cyn
I knew her when she was just a girl with a resume on Armitage Ave -- when you see her, you'll know -- her blonde hair swarming around her like a halo as she walks through the city's streets, turning in between pedestrians, cars, and sips of coffee.

Cyn came from the middle. The middle class. The middle of the country. The canyon between Chicago and her suburban Michigan roots is astounding, considering how naturally she fits in this puzzle. She describes her upbringing as being very average -- her parents earned an average income, the average amount of children, the average divorce, the all American thing four generations forward. She came from the everyfamily where education and hard work is expected. Her creative pursuits were often dismissed by their Midwestern sensibilities. The improbabilities were said so often, however her ambition was not born from wanting to be like everybody else. She wanted it, and continues to work for it. So, her songwriting was something magical that provided an escape for her. When she was singing and writing, no longer was she just average, in the middle, in suburban Michigan. Indeed this voice of hers has brought her out, and across the world. She doesn't feel ashamed of wanting to be known any longer.

When she is in the galleries of the Art Institute, flying to Los Angeles, or islanding in Greece, her middle class upbringing seems like another planet away. However, she's still a grounded girl, as sweet as the day she first arrived, a virgin to this world. The intelligence in her eyes still shines brightly and invitingly to whoever has the blessing to run into her. She prioritizes culture of all forms, from all corners of the city, and all corners of the world.

Cyn writes to cynthasize and make sense of this world whirling around her. She writes prayers for kids like us. She wears her emotions outwardly and unabashedly. Through her voice, you can hear her speak of transition, comfort, love, and moving on. Her writing and her music is her escape and her therapy. The rawness of her sound lead her into successful collaborations with Galamatias, JERMS, and others in the music community in Chicago, Los Angeles, and the greater part of this planet. Her reliance on her faith has led her to the recording of her E.P. in L.A. slated for a 2017 release.

The all American girl can accomplish anything, really. I see it in the way she walks and the way she talks. Wherever she goes, I assure you, all eyes are on her.