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METZ

Noisy and distortion-heavy rock and roll from Toronto trio

METZ

Moaning, Deathlist

Sat, December 9

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Doug Fir Lounge

Portland, OR

$20.00

Sold Out

This event is 21 and over

METZ
METZ
Since releasing their self-titled debut record in 2012, which The New Yorkercalled, “One of the year’s best albums...a punishing, noisy, exhilarating thing,” the Toronto-based 3-piece METZ have garnered international acclaim as one of the most electrifying and forceful live acts, touring widely and extensively, playing hundreds of shows each year around the world.Now, Alex Edkins (guitar, vocals), along with Hayden Menzies (drums), and Chris Slorach (bass) are set to unleash their highly-anticipated third full-length album, Strange Peace, an emphatic but artful hammer swing to the status quo."The best punk isn't an assault as much as it's a challenge —to what's normal, to what's comfortable, or simply to what's expected. Teetering on the edge of perpetual implosion,” NPRwrote in their glowing review of METZ’s 2015 second album, II.Strange Peacewas recorded in Chicago, live off the floor to tape with Steve Albini. The result is a distinct artistic maturation into new and alarming territory, frantically pushing past where the band has gone before, while capturing the notorious intensity of their live show.“Recording in Chicago was a blast. We tracked fourteen songs in four days. It was the first time we felt confident enough to just play live and roll tape,” Edkins said of the recording process. “Strange Peaceis much morediverse and varied than anything we’ve done before, which was exhilarating, but terrifying, too. We took the tapes home to Toronto feeling like we’d made the record we wanted to make.”The trio continued to assemble the album (including home recordings, additional instrumentation) back in their hometown, adding the finishing touches with longtime collaborator, engineer and mixer, Graham Walsh.From the ferocious opening track, “Mess of Wires,” we’re met by the sheer force and fierce musicianship we’ve come to expect from METZ. With the unhinged, post-punk fragments of “Drained Lake,” and the whirling, acerbic pop features of "Cellophane," the band's hectic progression becomes clear. But Strange Peaceisn’t merely a collection of eleven uninhibited and urgent songs. It’s also a kind of sonic venting, a truculent social commentary that bludgeons and provokes, excites and unsettles.“The songs on Strange Peaceare about uncertainty," Edkins explains. "They're about recognizing that we're not always in control of our own fate, and about admitting our mistakes and fears. They're about finding some semblance of peace within the chaos."With all the pleasurable tension and anxiety of a fever dream, Strange Peaceis equal parts challenging and accessible. It isthis implausible balancing act, moving from one end of the musical spectrum to the other, that only a band of METZ’s power and capacity can maintain: discordant and melodic, powerful and controlled, meticulous and instinctive, subtle and complex, precise and reckless, wholehearted and merciless, brutal and optimistic, terrifying and fun.
“Their whiplash of distortion is made with precision, a contained chaos. But you would never talk about them like that. Because METZ are not something you study or analyze,” wrote Liisa Ladouceur in Exclaim!“They are something you feel: a transfer of energy, pure and simple.”In other words: to feel something, fiercely and intensely, but together, not alone.
Moaning
Since releasing their self-titled debut record in 2012, which The New Yorker called, “One of the year’s best albums…a punishing, noisy, exhilarating thing,” the Toronto-based 3-piece METZ have garnered international acclaim as one of the most electrifying and forceful live acts, touring widely and extensively, playing hundreds of shows each year around the world.

Now, Alex Edkins (guitar, vocals), along with Hayden Menzies (drums), and Chris Slorach (bass) are set to unleash their highly-anticipated third full-length album, Strange Peace, an emphatic but artful hammer swing to the status quo.

"The best punk isn't an assault as much as it's a challenge — to what's normal, to what's comfortable, or simply to what's expected. Teetering on the edge of perpetual implosion,” NPR wrote in their glowing review of METZ’s 2015 second album, II.

Strange Peace was recorded in Chicago, live off the floor to tape with Steve Albini. The result is a distinct artistic maturation into new and alarming territory, frantically pushing past where the band has gone before, while capturing the notorious intensity of their live show.

“Recording in Chicago was a blast. We tracked fourteen songs in four days. It was the first time we felt confident enough to just play live and roll tape,” Edkins said of the recording process. “Strange Peace is much more diverse and varied than anything we’ve done before, which was exhilarating, but terrifying, too. We took the tapes home to Toronto feeling like we’d made the record we wanted to make.”

The trio continued to assemble the album (including home recordings, additional instrumentation) back in their hometown, adding the finishing touches with longtime collaborator, engineer and mixer, Graham Walsh.

From the ferocious opening track, “Mess of Wires,” we’re met by the sheer force and fierce musicianship we’ve come to expect from METZ. With the unhinged, post-punk fragments of “Drained Lake,” and the whirling, acerbic pop features of "Cellophane," the band's hectic progression becomes clear. But Strange Peace isn’t merely a collection of eleven uninhibited and urgent songs. It’s also a kind of sonic venting, a truculent social commentary that bludgeons and provokes, excites and unsettles.

“The songs on Strange Peace are about uncertainty," Edkins explains. "They're about recognizing that we're not always in control of our own fate, and about admitting our mistakes and fears. They're about finding some semblance of peace within the chaos."

With all the pleasurable tension and anxiety of a fever dream, Strange Peace is equal parts challenging and accessible. It is this implausible balancing act, moving from one end of the musical spectrum to the other, that only a band of METZ’s power and capacity can maintain: discordant and melodic, powerful and controlled, meticulous and instinctive, subtle and complex, precise and reckless, wholehearted and merciless, brutal and optimistic, terrifying and fun.

“Their whiplash of distortion is made with precision, a contained chaos. But you would never talk about them like that. Because METZ are not something you study or analyze,” wrote Liisa Ladouceur in Exclaim! “They are something you feel: a transfer of energy, pure and simple.”

In other words: to feel something, fiercely and intensely, but together, not alone.
Deathlist
Deathlist
A few weeks before she was to enter the studio to work on a new release from her project Deathlist, singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Jenny Logan sprained her shoulder. What for most of us would be a minor inconvenience forced this artist to rethink how to play the songs that would make up her forthcoming EP Weaks.

“My plan was to play everything live with a band,” Logan remembers, “but I didn’t know if I’d be able to play at all. I ended up playing everything myself out of necessity rather than my own design. I deconstructed the drum parts and put them back together again, and had to play all the guitar and bass parts sitting down.”

What was born of necessity wound up being integral to the emotional weight of Weaks. Recorded with the help of Hutch Harris of The Thermals, the mini-album explores Logan’s personal life, examining past relationships and the various internal and external issues that led to their demise. The songs are stark and direct and unavoidable due to the empty space and minimalist production.

It can be, at times, a little startling, like the small waver that enters Logan’s voice as she sings “Wish I could be the one to/Wish I could let you come through/but I can’t feel anything” over a bed of acoustic guitar and pulsing synth on “I Can’t Feel Anything.” And sometimes it can cut deep even as the music takes up a small head of steam as on “Sleeper,” a gently rousing bit of post-punk that features Logan singing about an intimate relationship that remains “incomplete” due to reticence and fear.

Weaks culminates with the title track, a moving midtempo track where Logan sounds almost hopeful for what the future of her love life might be. “I’m gonna find it somewhere/I’ve been weak a long time,” she sings. “That song really crystallized the concept of the EP,” she says.

“It’s about admitting weakness and coming to terms with my own faults but still being somewhat optimistic.” One thing Logan can be completely assured about is her artistic future. Deathlist has already received acclaim for this project’s first self-titled album from publications like The FADER, Willamette Week, and Impose Magazine. Once Weaks hits the streets, it’s only a matter of time before the rest of the world sits up and takes notice.